Christ in Us: A MLK Day Reflection

Remember today that Jesus has a physical body. For thirty years, it was localized in a small Jewish community. It performed miracles like making sure celebrations of life happened, that there was enough wine at the party, making sure sicknesses were being cured, making sure that people were fed and that the message was proclaimed that the poor are blessed and that the captives are free. That is, crying out through word and deed that the Kingdom of God was at hand. That body suffered and died tearing down boundaries between God and people and between people and people. It was willing to give up all things in order to reconcile them to itself.

And for the last 2000 years, this same body has exploded globally.
The only Jesus physically present on this earth is you and me.

And over the past 2000 years we have seen it perform miracles like making sure celebrations of life happened, that there was enough wine at the party. We have seen it making sure sicknesses were being cured, making sure that people were fed and that the message was proclaimed that the poor are blessed and that the captives are free. That is, the Body of Christ must continue to cry out through word and deed that the Kingdom of God is at hand.

And so as we celebrate Martin Luther King today, one member of that Body, we have to ask ourselves: is the body of 21st century Christ willing to suffer and die tearing down boundaries between God and people and between people and people? Are we willing to give up everything to reconcile all things? How would our way of life respond?

“Therefore we must never feel that God will, through some breath-taking miracle or a wave of the hand, cast evil out of the world. As long as we believe this we will pray unanswerable prayers and ask God to do things he will never do. The belief that God will do everything for man is as untenable as the belief that man can do everything for himself. It, too, is based on a lack of faith. We must learn that to expect God to do everything while we do nothing is not faith, but superstition.”
-Martin Luther King, Strength to Love, 133.

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